PerlSharedHosting

Latest Web::Simple master (git://git.shadowcat.co.uk/catagits/Web-Simple.git) is now using Plack, the perl web server directly for CGI and FastCGI and I hope do do another release shortly with notes on deploying as both on shared hosts (more specifically Dreamhost but with an invitation to bitch if they don’t work on other budget hosts).

mst,  ”Oh Subdispatch, Oh Subdispatch

Every time someone mentions a cool new web framework like Web::Simple, Dancer or Tatsumaki, my immediate reaction is to start thinking up cool little niche web apps I could build with it. You know, the kind you imagine yourself whipping up during your lunch break, that will probably never get more than 10 curious users but just might turn into the next big thing if only you got it up and running on a public server. And that’s when the second thought immediately arrives: where am I going to run this thing? Do I really think the idea has enough legs to justify paying for a virtual server plan? Can I be bothered going through the pain of figuring out how to deploy it on a shared hosting provider? And normally that’s the point where I sigh wistfully and go back to reading my RSS feeds.

The thing is, with the advent of things like local::lib it’s getting a lot easier to deploy Perl web apps on shared hosting. And with most web frameworks adopting Plack/PSGI, the work required to deploy Perl web apps on budget hosts is converging into a similar sequence of steps.

So this time during my lunch break I started envisaging a centralised, SEO-friendly information source (hello perlsharedhosting.com) that cobbles together all of the currently available information into an easy to digest form to make it ridiculously easy to choose a shared hosting provider, deploy your web app and troubleshoot common problems.

A site that works like this:

  • The front page contains a list of Perl-friendly hosting providers, with a meta-score based on how many features they support (+) and how many unresolved issues they have (-), and maybe user review scores thrown into the mix too
  • Each hosting provider has a page of its own, listing in full which features are supported (used to compute the meta-score). Users can post comments on each of these pages, to leave testimonials (“I am currently running a Web::Simple site that gets x hits per hour on this host”) and note unresolved issues (“module X::Y fails to install on this host”). As issues get solved these become tips.
  • Each technology/feature/technique also gets a page of its own, with links to the official man pages, shared-hosting specific notes and again user comments

I haven’t decided yet what engine would fit best.. MojoMojo is a front-runner, and in fact the Catalyst Friendly Hosting page runs on MojoMojo does a large chunk of what I’ve described above.

The site would be very “cookbook” oriented, since we’re specifically targeting people who can’t be bothered learning the ins and outs of 10 different technologies (not to mention figuring out how to get them to play nicely together) for the sake of deploying toy web applications on cheap shared hosting. Just the essentials: this is what you need, this is how you achieve it. And if you want to learn more, go here.

With that in place, we’d end up with a single, visible, place to research and document the complications of running Perl web apps on shared hosting. And if the site became popular, hosting providers might even take notice and start offering more Perl-friendly shared environments. We could have live demo pages running on different hosts, possibly even donated by hosting providers if they see it as a way of showcasing their Perl-friendliness (mojomojo.dreamhost.perlsharedhosting.com, dancer.resellerzoom.perlsharedhosting.com, etc..).

I got as far as registering the domain name; I was planning on getting a simple MojoMojo prototype up and running, but I got side-tracked researching how to deploy it on my shared hosting account…

5 thoughts on “PerlSharedHosting”

  1. Did you get Mojomojo running on Dreamhost? I spent several hours last night but could not figure it out. The main hurdle being DH’s procwatch killing perl due to memory consumption every time I tried to build Catalyst. I considered contacting support but the procedure is explicitly not supported according to their wiki. So if you succeeded, please let us know. Cheers.

  2. Hi,

    I’ve got private hosting with dreamhost and wouldn’t mind creating an account for you to play with. Email me if you’d like to use that space.

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